Hari Drama Hari Gaia

In Friday’s Independent, Johann Hari has achieved a quite remarkable feat.

How I wish that the global warming deniers were right
Are you prepared to take a 50-50 gamble on the habitability of the planet?

In just 1400 words he manages to cram in just about every fallacy from the environmentalist’s handbook: he appeals to the dodgiest of authorities, sells politics, catastrophism and factoids as scientific truth, misrepresents his opponents’ arguments, cherrypicks data, explains human behaviour in biologically deterministic terms and politics in environmentally deterministic ones, and resorts to the green equivalent of Pascal’s wager while accusing ‘deniers’ of religious zeal.

So let’s start at the very beginning, where he ploughs straight in with the ultimate in appeals to authority:

Every day, I pine for the global warming deniers to be proved right. I loved the old world – of flying to beaches wherever we want, growing to the skies, and burning whatever source of energy came our way. I hate the world to come that I’ve seen in my reporting from continent after continent – of falling Arctic ice shelves, of countries being swallowed by the sea, of vicious wars for the water and land that remains. When I read the works of global warming deniers like Nigel Lawson or Ian Plimer, I feel a sense of calm washing over me. The nightmare is gone; nothing has to change; the world can stay as it was.

That’s right – the authority he cites is himself. The insufferably misanthropic and self-important ‘comedian’ Marcus Brigstocke, who has also been to the Arctic to see melting ice – twice – so you don’t have to, did the same thing on a recent edition of the BBC’s Question Time (available in the UK only):

I’ve visited the Arctic twice, and the ice is disappearing. I can tell you that the Inuit people that I met in Greenland, who are not part of some grand conspiracy as Melanie [Phillips] might have it, will tell you, year on year, they are seeing dramatic changes. The ice is reducing significantly. You know, I helped a team of scientists from the National Oceanography centre to carry out their experiments [etc]

We should believe Hari and Brigstocke, their argument goes, because they have access to information that we do not. It’s the very stuff of dodgy dossiers. (Talking of which, Hari initially supported the invasion of Iraq, so we look forward to another article at some point where he confesses how ‘terribly wrong‘ he has been on climate change, too.) What’s more, merely witnessing melting polar ice for yourself is merely evidence that polar ice melts when it’s warming enough. There is a gaping crevasse between what Hari and Brigstocke have seen and what they think it is evidence for – which is that catastrophe beckons. Hari and Brigstocke’s personal investments in the plight of the Arctic means we should be less, not more willing to believe them.

Back to Hari:

But then I go back to the facts. However much I want them to be different, they sit there, hard and immovable. Nobody disputes that greenhouse gases trap heat in the atmosphere, like a blanket holding in the Sun’s rays. Nobody disputes that we are increasing the amount of those greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. And nobody disputes that the world has become considerably hotter over the past century. (If you disagree with any of these statements, you’d fail a geography GCSE).

The funny thing here is that Hari is correct that nobody would dispute any of these statements, to the extent that even those he has just introduced as ‘deniers’, Ian Plimer and Nigel Lawson, do not dispute them. We can only assume he has read neither of them. Plimer and Lawson hold variously that such statements do not lead inevitably to planetary disaster, that the human influence on warming trends is overstated, that other influences are understated, that the climate system is rather more complicated than such a one-dimensional portrayal would suggest, and that a single-pronged attack on CO2 emissions is undesirable – not that the greenhouse effect is not real or that the world has not been warming. He continues:

Yet half our fellow citizens are choosing to believe the deniers who say there must be gaps between these statements big enough to fit an excuse for carrying on as we are. Shrieking at them is not going to succeed.

What Hari cannot imagine is that large swathes of the public are choosing not to believe the pseudo-scientific hyperbole of alarmists like Hari, even though his very article provides them with all the reason they need. Indeed, in his next breath he resorts to writing off public opinion as the product of primaeval biological urges rather than the result of considered judgement of the available evidence and arguments:

Our first response has to be to accept that this denial is an entirely natural phenomenon. The facts of global warming are inherently weird, and they run contrary to our evolved instincts. If you burn an odourless, colourless gas in Europe, it will cause the Arctic to melt and Bangladesh to drown and the American Mid-West to dry up? By living our normal lives, doing all the things we have been brought up doing, we can make great swathes of the planet uninhabitable? If your first response is incredulity, then you’re a normal human being.

Talk about a backhanded compliment. But as a ‘normal human being’, you are a slave not only to your pre-programmed selfish desires, but also to the mind-controlling propaganda of big business:

It’s tempting to allow this first response to harden into a dogma, and use it to cover your eyes. The oil and gas industries have been spending billions to encourage us to stay stuck there, because their profits will plummet when we make the transition to a low-carbon society. But the basic science isn’t actually very complicated, or hard to grasp. As more carbon dioxide is pumped into the atmosphere, the world gets warmer…

Meanwhile, normal human beings are apparently impervious to the onslaught of PR from green pressure groups. As we’ve shown elsewhere, the funds available to the likes of Greenpeace and WWF are orders of magnitude greater than that spent by the ‘well-funded denial machine’.

And there’s more cherry-picking where that came from:

…Every single year since 1917 has been hotter than 1917. Every single year since 1956 has been hotter than 1956. Every single year since 1992 has been hotter than 1992. And on, and on. If we dramatically increase the carbon dioxide even more – as we are – we will dramatically increase the warming. Many parts of the world will dry up or flood or burn.

According to the Met Office’s annual global data series 1850-1998, 1917 and 1992 were exceptionally cold years: there were only 5 years cooler than 1917 in the preceding 66 years; after 1992, the next coldest year was 1878. And we can all play Hari’s game: every year since 1998 has been cooler than 1998, for example.

Moreover, all Hari has achieved here is to restate his initial uncontested premise that the world has been warming over the last century. Just saying it a bit louder this time doesn’t make it any more important or dangerous, or informative as to how to respond. Which is why he has also had to escalate the alarmism.

This is such an uncomfortable claim that I too I have tried to grasp at any straw that suggests it is wrong. One of the most tempting has come in the past few weeks, when the emails of the Hadley Centre at the University of East Anglia were hacked into, and seem on an initial reading to show that a few of their scientists were misrepresenting their research to suggest the problem is slightly worse than it is. Some people have seized on it as a fatal blow – a Pentagon Papers for global warming.

But then I looked at the facts. It was discovered more than a century ago that burning fossil fuels would release warming gases and therefore increase global temperatures, and since then, hundreds of thousands of scientists have independently reached the conclusion that it will have terrible consequences…

By now, Hari has drifted far from his reference point of the physics of the greenhouse and is bobbing around helplessly in a sea of catastrophism. The gap can be bridged only by a blatant untruth. Having started the paragraph with the statement that what followed were the true facts, he just makes it up. ‘Hundreds of thousands of scientists’? And there we were thinking that the ‘2500 scientists of the IPCC‘ claim was overstating things. All the scientists, in all the world, across all the scientific sub-disciplines, probably only amount to hundreds of thousands. And it gets worse with almost every additional word: ‘Hundreds of thousands of scientists have independently‘ reached the same conclusion? Is that even humanly possible? Does he think that each scientist has their own personal ivory tower or something? ‘Hundreds of thousands of scientists have independently reached the conclusion that it will have terrible consequences‘?

A good argument made by just a single scientist trumps even hundreds of thousands of scientists that exist only in someone’s head. So let us quote the University of East Anglia climate scientist, and former director of the Tyndall Centre, Mike Hulme, who is concerned that science is being used to provide certainty over big, complex political issues:

The language of catastrophe is not the language of science. It will not be visible in next year’s global assessment from the world authority of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

To state that climate change will be “catastrophic” hides a cascade of value-laden assumptions which do not emerge from empirical or theoretical science.

Meanwhile Hari hasn’t even got to the end of his paragraph:

…It would be very surprising if, somewhere among them, there wasn’t a charlatan or two who over-hyped their work. Such people exist in every single field of science (and they are deplorable).

So let’s knock out the Hadley Centre’s evidence. Here are just a fraction of the major scientific organisations that have independently verified the evidence that man-made global warming is real, and dangerous: Nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, L’Academie des Sciences, the Indian National Science Academy, the US National Academy of Sciences, the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina, the UK’s Royal Society, the Academia Brasileira de Ciencias, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the US Environmental Protection Agency… I could fill this entire article with these names.

Well, at least he’s not citing citing himself this time. But he is wrong to say that these institutions have independently verified the evidence. Research bodies such as NASA and NOAA do, like Hadley, collect and analyse data, and test hypotheses, but Hari is lumping these together with scientific academies and professional bodies that represent their membership politically, which have simply issued position statements to the effect that the world has been warming, that anthropogenic greenhouse gases probably have much to with it, and that this presents problems. To ‘knock out the Hadley Centre’s evidence’ is to write off, among many other lines of research, its global surface temperature record (HADCRUT), which, along with NASA’s GISTEMP, is perhaps the most scientifically important and politically influential climate datsets in existence.

A further sign of Hari’s ignorance on the matter is that it was the University of East Anglia’s Climatic Research Centre (CRU) that was hacked, not Hadley. And Hadley is part of the UK Met Office, not, as Hari says, UEA. But Hadley produces HADCRUT in conjunction with CRU, so by Hari’s reckoning Hadley and CRU should both be ‘knocked out’. Which leaves him with a single temperature record, and a bunch of position statements from organisations that exist to represent their members’ interests. Last year, we took a look at the gestation of the statement issued by one of those professional bodies – the American Geophysical Union – and argued that these statements should be seen as political attempts to put science centre-stage of climate debates rather than objective appraisals of the state of knowledge.

And they haven’t only used one method to study the evidence. They’ve used satellite data, sea level measurements, borehole analysis, sea ice melt, permafrost melt, glacial melt, drought analysis, and on and on. All of this evidence from all of these scientists using all these methods has pointed in one direction. As the conservative journalist Hugo Rifkind put it, the Hadley Centre no more discredits climate science than Harold Shipman discredits GPs.

Climategate may not discredit climate science, but neither does climate science uphold Hari’s apocalyptic vision.

A study for the journal Science randomly sampled 928 published peer-reviewed scientific papers that used the words “climate change”. It found that 100 per cent – every single one – agreed it is being fuelled by human activity. There is no debate among climate scientists. There are a few scientists who don’t conduct research into the climate who disagree, but going to them to find out how global warming works is a bit like going to a chiropodist and asking her to look at your ears.

The Science paper Hari refers to is this one by Naomi Oreskes. She does indeed find evidence for a consensus. But it is a consensus only that ‘the evidence for human modification of climate is compelling’. What Hari does not mention is that Oreskes concluded that:

The question of what to do about climate change is also still open

For Hari, the fact of climate change is equivalent to the moral imperative he thinks it produces. To say that ‘climate change is real’, is to say ‘what is to be done’. As with so many other activists, there is no argument about how to interpret climate change statistics to work out a sensible response. So any degree of scepticism, or any argument about how to respond to degrees of climate change with degrees of responses naturally returns Hari to the core, binary, fact: ‘climate change is real’.

Part of the confusion in the public mind seems to stem from the failure to understand that two things are happening at once. There has always been – and always will be – natural variation in the climate. The ebb from hot to cold is part of Planet Earth. But on top of that, we are adding a large human blast of warming – and it is disrupting the natural rhythm. So when, in opinion polls, people say warming is “natural”, they are right, but it’s only one part of the story.

What worries Hari is that the ‘public mind’ has coped with the nuances of the debate. The idea that the extent of climate change and its effects might have been exaggerated is dangerous.

Once you have grasped this, it’s easy to see through the claim that global warming stopped in 1998 and the world has been cooling ever since. In 1998, two things came together: the natural warming process of El Nino was at its peak, and our human emissions of warming gases were also rising – so we got the hottest year ever recorded. Then El Nino abated, but the carbon emissions kept up. That’s why the world has remained far warmer than before – eight of the 10 hottest years on record have happened in the past decade – without quite reaching the same peak. Again: if we carry on pumping out warming gases, we will carry on getting warmer.

Hari wants to claim that ‘two things are happening at once’ – which may well be true – but is not happy with the corollary that it may be more of the natural than the anthropogenic. No scientist could state with the certainty that Hari has that the persistence of post-98 temperatures can be attributed to increases in CO2. ‘That is why…’ Hari claims, but it is premature. It may well turn out to be true, but the point is not that science can or has said anything about global temperatures, the point is that the ‘scientific’ account that Hari gives is intended to make statements about those who would interpret things differently. The scientific account is used to diminish the moral and intellectual character of ‘deniers’:

That’s why I won’t use the word “sceptic” to describe the people who deny the link between releasing warming gases and the planet getting warmer. I am a sceptic. I have looked at the evidence highly critically, desperate for flaws. The overwhelming majority of scientists are sceptics: the whole nature of scientific endeavour is to check and check and check again for a flaw in your theory or your evidence. Any properly sceptical analysis leads to the conclusion that man-made global warming is real. Denial is something different: it is when no evidence, no matter how overwhelming, could convince you. It is a faith-based position.

Which is rather rich coming from somebody who has just demonstrated that he doesn’t know what those he calls ‘deniers’ are denying, or what ‘science says’, let alone somebody who has to make up what ‘science says’ in order to make moral arguments about ‘deniers’. Also on Friday, Hari popped up on the BBC’s Newsnight Review for a discussion on climate change and culture:

Talking about the Arctic, you know, I was out there this summer to report on this. You know, the Arctic in my lifetime has lost 40% of its summer ice. By 2012 the North Pole will be a point in the open ocean

We have no idea where he plucked these figures from. Hari was born in 1979, which, as luck would have it, is when the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) satellite records begin. According to those records, Arctic summer ice has declined by about 30% since then. We wouldn’t want to be too hard on him for what might well have been an honest slip of the tongue. His prophecy (note the certainty of his statement) about an ice free Arctic summer, is far more malignant. The IPCC’s AR4 estimates it will take 50 to 100 years for that to happen. But there was a record melt after AR4 was written, so NSIDC has come up with a ball-park date of 2030 based on extrapolation from recent melting trends. Other estimates range over many decades and well into the next century. We assume Hari must be referring to Jay Zwally’s study, which is mentioned here. If so, he is missing a trick; if he wants a single scientist’s estimate to speak for science, he could have quoted David Barber of the University of Manitoba who predicted an ice free Arctic summer by last year.

At issue is not really ‘what science says’ about the world’s temperature, nor even speculation about the date at which we can expect the Arctic to be free of ice in summer. The majority of climate scientists could easily take issue with Hari’s silly claim, but it wouldn’t be a very interesting read. What is at issue is the way in which Hari carries on not only making up stats such as this, but wielding them as some kind of talisman, which gives him moral authority. His wild speculation about the future of Arctic ice speaks more about the way in which ‘the science’ exists as a means by which Hari can express his shrill internal dialog. He makes stuff up to give himself a voice, and defends it by claiming to be the vessel through which science speaks. He, like the vast majority of scientists, is the sceptic, he announces. Pity that he’s not such a sceptic that he ever checks his own argument. As we’ve said previously, this inability to self-reflect is the symptom of the angry, shrill, non-scientist, moralising, and disoriented journalist-activists such as Monbiot, Lynas, and now Hari. What they write is science fiction. They incautiously assemble scientific factoids, removed from their scientific context, to construct terrifying narratives about the future. This elevates them to the status of planet-saving super-journos, and from this platform their bizarre stories become the device through which they interpret the world. But they are merely peering into their own arseholes, not, as they claim, through the prism of scientific objectivity. What they see is chaos and catastrophe, but what they do not recognise in what they see is that it is entirely their own confusion staring back at them.

Throughout this blog, and in our last two posts in the context of Climategate, we have argued that environmental politics, not environmental science, underpins the war on climate change, and that at the centre of that politics sits the precautionary principle. We are grateful to Hari, then, for supporting our thesis. He ends his article by casting aside all that science and appealing to the precautionary principle in the form of Pascal’s wager:

So let’s – for the sake of argument – make an extraordinary and unjustified concession to the deniers. Let’s imagine there was only a 50 per cent chance that virtually all the world’s climate scientists are wrong. Would that be a risk worth taking? Are you prepared to take a 50-50 gamble on the habitability of the planet? Is the prospect of getting our energy from the wind and the waves and the sun so terrible that’s not worth it on even these wildly optimistic odds?

We’ll leave aside Hari’s claim that ‘virtually all the world’s climate scientists’ agree that climate change is set to render the planet uninhabitable, other than to say that he seems to be confusing ‘virtually all the world’s climate scientists’ with the singular James Lovelock.

So, first, Hari extrapolates from a handful of rather mundane consensus statements about atmospheric physics in order to conclude that there is only one way forward politically. And now he’s telling us that there’s still only one way forward politically even if those consensus statements are wrong. He presents the future as a stark choice between two competing visions – zero carbon or an uninhabitable planet. Environmentalism or death. He reinforces the point with a story:

Imagine you are about to get on a plane with your family. A huge group of qualified airline mechanics approach you on the tarmac and explain they’ve studied the engine for many years and they’re sure it will crash if you get on board. They show you their previous predictions of plane crashes, which have overwhelmingly been proven right. Then a group of vets, journalists, and plumbers tell they have looked at the diagrams and it’s perfectly obvious to them the plane is safe and that airplane mechanics – all of them, everywhere – are scamming you. Would you get on the plane? That is our choice at Copenhagen.

Hari’s little story is intended to be a cautionary tale about which kind of expertise is pertinent, but it fails, as so many dumbed-down analogies fail. In his striving for simplicity, he not only patronises his readers, but he loses any purchase on the arguments in the debate that is taking place. We picked up Andrew Dessler for the same mistake a couple of years ago. Dessler – a former scientific advisor to Clinton – had asked us to imagine the warming world as a child sick with cancer. Would you take the child to the best pediatric cancer specialists, or to non-specialists, he asked:

So Freeman Dyson makes lists. While I’m certain he’s a smart guy, I would not take a sick child to him, and I won’t take a sick planet to him either. In both cases, he simply does not have the relevant specialist knowledge. That also applies the large number of social scientists, computer programmers, engineers, etc., without any specialist knowledge on this problem. The bottom line is that the opinions of most of the skeptics on the list are simply not credible.

Unfortunately for Dessler, we tested his claim that the IPCC were the specialist doctors in his analogy by counting the specialisms of the latest IPCC report’s contributors. It turns out that many of them were precisely the ‘social scientists, computer programmers, engineers, etc., without any specialist knowledge on this problem’ that he had complained about. (You can read about WGI here, WGII here and WGIII here). Our detractors argued that we had been disingenuous, and that only IPCC WGI counts, the other two groups – which comprised a much larger proportion of ‘non-expert’ opinions – being less concerned with the ‘Physical Science Basis’, and focusing instead on ‘Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability’, and the ‘Mitigation of Climate Change’. This misses the point that the arguments about what kind of problem climate change is and what to do about it emerge almost exclusively from WGII and WGIII, not from WGI, yet the putative scientific authority of the IPCC emerges exclusively from WGI.

What Hari, like Dessler, forgets is the difference between the sensitivity of climate to CO2, and the sensitivity of society to climate. Or to put it more broadly, there is a difference between the natural world’s sensitivity to CO2, and human society’s sensitivity to changes in the natural world. Hari and his ilk like to stress the equivalence between the environment’s and society’s sensitivity. They seem to feel that once the scientific case has been made, the political and moral argument has been had and won. This environmental determinism, we have argued, reflects the hollowness of their own outlooks, hence the interminable screeching, hectoring and ranty tone of commentators like Hari, and our favourite, George ‘air travel is like child abuse‘ Monbiot.

We can all tell stories. You’re about to get on a plane with your family. A group of shrill and sanctimonious journalists from the Guardian and Independent newspapers tell you that, if you take the journey, poor people all over the world will die wretched, horrible deaths. They show you statistics showing how many people have died already, and how many more will die in the future. ‘You will be culpable for their deaths’, they say. ‘Do you want their blood on your hands?’ they ask. Then another group of non-experts arrive. They say that there are many ways to understand the poverty that kills people, and that not taking the journey won’t make such lives any better. The journalists return, they say that the other group are funded by huge corporate interests, and cannot be trusted because they are either mad or bad. They tell you that they have science on their side, that climate change is real and is happening, and that they have witnessed its ravages for themselves. Who are you going to trust,’ they demand, ‘us, or the other group?’ Shouldn’t you take the cautious route, just in case? After all, they might be right. You step down from the plane. But as you walk across the tarmac, you notice that the journalists are now getting on the plane. Some of them are going to Copenhagen. One is heading across the Atlantic to lecture Canadians about their climate responsibilities. Another is off to the Arctic, to see some climate change.

16 thoughts on “Hari Drama Hari Gaia”

  1. Excellent post. Vacillation at Copenhagen, declining public attention to the catastrophists and their fear tactics, and a continued low level of solar activity will see the bastards off. Not to mention the possibility of an election/referendum on the Australian ETS next year.

    Time and the blogosphere are on our side.

  2. Another fine post.

    Monbiot’s self-righteousness, not to mention self-regard, is particularly nauseating. “I gave up child abuse of my own accord for a while but now Canada needs me, so come over here, kiddies.”

    For non-UK readers: Brigstocke, an alleged comedian, is a typical public (which means “private” elsewhere) school boy of the type who has a superficial, fashionable, guilt trip.
    He is not unlike Monbiot and many others of the UK environmentalist crowd in many respects. He appears to despise the privileged class of which he is a member, but easily lapses into patrician pomposity when the subject is one of his hobby horses, believing that his scorn alone should sway any plebs who are stupid enough not to agree with him.
    Of course, he rarely performs in front of anyone who disagrees with him. His audience is one which is going to laugh along with his lazy, humour-free rants against “deniers” and share in the smugness.

  3. Excellent stuff.

    I was sort of hoping you might take on this quite outrageous article at the “New Scientist” (now that is potentially a worrying phrase if science is going that way, given this article).

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18238-why-theres-no-sign-of-a-climate-conspiracy-in-hacked-emails.html?full=true

    This is linked on the same point as the one you have analysed on http://www.climatedebatedaily.com and covers much of the same self ingratiating territory as you nicely phrase above:

    … merely peering into their own arseholes, not, as they claim, through the prism of scientific objectivity.

    Just try reading some of the comments against the New Scientist one – aside from the fact the article is a blatant whitewash – the comments are some of the most vitriolic I’ve ever seen.

    Its shameful how far a once great magazine (of which I was an avid reader when I was younger) has slipped.

  4. Isn’t this cosy? Climate change deniers patting each other on the back and saying that as long as we redefine the words ‘fact’ and (overwhelming) ‘evidence’ then climate change will go away (Did I understand your first mission statement correctly?).

    Well, I’d like to throw a cat among the pigeons, not the least because after Johann Hari’s insightful reporting on everything from gay rights and the war in Congo to the situation in Palestine and the evils of dogmatic religion, I find it hard to believe that he is suddenly spouting complete nonsense.

    To start from the beginning, I don’t know why the blog criticises Johann Hari’s introduction as he is just setting the scene by describing his mental state – not trying to state any hard facts that he backs up with his own authority as is claimed.

    Some more statements in the blog:
    “the climate system is rather more complicated than such a one-dimensional portrayal would suggest”
    >Is this trying to imply that climate scientists are trying to simplify things and that is why they come up with faulty results? From what I’ve seen climate science is plenty complex, what with all the feedbacks and carbon sources/sinks. The focus is on much more than just CO2, the Kyoto protocol regulates six greenhouse gases.

    “public opinion as the product of primaeval biological urges”
    >I think you are underestimating psychology, it is based on a lot more than just primaeval biological urges – you are twisting Johann’s words here.

    “Research bodies such as NASA and NOAA do, like Hadley, collect and analyse data, and test hypotheses”
    >In this section, you are agreeing with the point that everybody comes to the same conclusion about the human influence on climate change. You can criticise the inclusion of more public relation-type bodies, but you are not providing any counter examples of credible institutes/universities that disagree. By the way, the reason that Johann lumps together CRU and the Hadley Centre is precisely because they made the data set together as you point out.

    “but is not happy with the corollary that it may be more of the natural than the anthropogenic”
    >Scientists have been able to separate the natural long-term variations in climate and the persistent upwards trend that is directly related to the emissions of greenhouse gases. They can also show which one is the most influential, so why the attempt to sow doubt by inferring that it is uncertain?

    “No scientist could state with the certainty that Hari has that the persistence of post-98 temperatures can be attributed to increases in CO2.”
    >Erm, yes they can. New Scientist explains clearly why:
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14527-climate-myths-global-warming-stopped-in-1998.html

    “This misses the point that the arguments about what kind of problem climate change is and what to do about it emerge almost exclusively from WGII and WGIII”
    >But you should be happy about this given your fifth mission statement: “5. How society should proceed in the face of a changing climate is the business of politics not science.”

    That’s enough I think, people can see that this is nothing but the unfounded opinions of two writers who criticise the IPCC report for not being scientific enough yet they do not provide information on their ‘about’ page to what makes them so excellently qualified to make these statements!

  5. “If you burn an odourless, colourless gas in Europe, it will cause the Arctic to melt and Bangladesh to drown and the American Mid-West to dry up?”

    I am little bit puzzled by this statement. Which odourless, colourless gas does he mean? Natural gas. I don’t think so, because natural gas for obvious reasons has an odour.

    Does he mean CO2? If yes, he should go back to school. You (still) can not burn CO2, unless you convert into fuel (a technic which I understand is still in its infancy). See attached link. CO2 is used in fire extinguishers and CO2 is the residual of burning, amongst others, fossil fuels.

    http://www.garagetv.be/video-galerij/carmeleon/CO2_omzetten_in_brandstof_oplossing_voor_het_klimaatprobleem_.aspx

    Maybe he means something else, but that’s not clear to me.

  6. Isn’t this cosy? Climate change deniers patting each other on the back and saying that as long as we redefine the words ‘fact’ and (overwhelming) ‘evidence’ then climate change will go away (Did I understand your first mission statement correctly?).

    No.

    It’s always encouraging to receive criticism that can only nitpick round the edges rather than address the argument (that Hari is selling dodgy political arguments as somehow flowing inevitably from ‘the science’). FWIW, we’re not writing off Hari’s entire corpus – but he’s been wrong before, by his own admission, and we think he’s wrong again now. As for the nitpicks…

    His intro is not just describing his mental state. He’s also saying that he’s seen the world that we’re heading for at the hands of climate change. He has seen the catastrophe in store. That’s what we’re criticising here.

    “the climate system is rather more complicated than such a one-dimensional portrayal would suggest”
    >Is this trying to imply that climate scientists are trying to simplify things and that is why they come up with faulty results? From what I’ve seen climate science is plenty complex, what with all the feedbacks and carbon sources/sinks. The focus is on much more than just CO2, the Kyoto protocol regulates six greenhouse gases.

    it’s Hari who is presenting us with the choice between adopting green energy and an uninhabitable planet. How one-dimensional do you want?

    “public opinion as the product of primaeval biological urges”
    >I think you are underestimating psychology, it is based on a lot more than just primaeval biological urges – you are twisting Johann’s words here.

    Hari calls them ‘evolved instincts’. What’s the difference?

    “Research bodies such as NASA and NOAA do, like Hadley, collect and analyse data, and test hypotheses”
    >In this section, you are agreeing with the point that everybody comes to the same conclusion about the human influence on climate change. You can criticise the inclusion of more public relation-type bodies, but you are not providing any counter examples of credible institutes/universities that disagree. By the way, the reason that Johann lumps together CRU and the Hadley Centre is precisely because they made the data set together as you point out.

    we think Hari has made a fundamental mistake here in claiming that all these institutions have ‘independently verified the evidence’. And you seem to agree. Your point? Off the top of our head, a counter example is the Japan Society of Energy and Resources (JSER) (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/02/25/jstor_climate_report_translation/). But that’s a distraction from the broader point that political statements by scientists are not the same as scientific analysis. As for the lumping of Hadley and CRU, if Hari meant what you say he meant, he should have said it, rather than saying something that is just wrong.

    Scientists have been able to separate the natural long-term variations in climate and the persistent upwards trend that is directly related to the emissions of greenhouse gases. They can also show which one is the most influential…

    perhaps you know something we don’t. Please tell.

    “No scientist could state with the certainty that Hari has that the persistence of post-98 temperatures can be attributed to increases in CO2.”
    >Erm, yes they can. New Scientist explains clearly why:

    but the article you cite is making the case that global warming hasn’t stopped as some sceptics claim. And even on that issue it’s couched with so many qualifiers – may, might, some scientists etc – so we’re not sure why you think it shows with certainty the respective contributions of anthropogenic and non-anth warming.

    “This misses the point that the arguments about what kind of problem climate change is and what to do about it emerge almost exclusively from WGII and WGIII”
    >But you should be happy about this given your fifth mission statement: “5. How society should proceed in the face of a changing climate is the business of politics not science.”

    eh? We were countering the claim that the IPCC is all about climate science. While you seem to think that appointing an expert committee of political scientists to make decisions is a substitute for democracy.

    That’s enough I think, people can see that this is nothing but the unfounded opinions of two writers who criticise the IPCC report for not being scientific enough yet they do not provide information on their ‘about’ page to what makes them so excellently qualified to make these statements!

    So what makes the non-scientist writer Hari so excellently qualified to make statements about the science?

  7. This is a punishing dissection of a bad journalist (I find it hard to believe anyone found anything he wrote particularly insightful, especially once he got on a plane and left the world of London media). But I’d much rather hear what you have to say about Copenhagen.

  8. It is a shame that Marcus Brigstock has become so sucked into this global warming debate (if you can call it a dabate rather than shouting match). I think his angry tirades are quite funny, you just have to separate yourself from what he is saying. He is like Jimmy Carr, what he says isn’t overtly offensive but it is designed to irratate a certain proportion of his audience. It is just a pity he can’t see the irony of traveling to the arctic twice to watch global warming in action. He may as well travel to Gibralta and watch tectonic motion in action.

  9. The ClimateGate affair has really shown up career journalists such as “carbon bomb” Johann Hari. I find it telling that the Spectator’s Hugo Rifkind’s contribution to the debate is his utterly clueless “Dr Shipman” comparison, and even more telling that Johann Hari’s contribution is his equally clueless citing of said comparison. Going strictly by what he has written, I doubt whether Hari has given the e-mails more than a cursory reading, let alone considered investigating the matter for himself. Are there any professional journalists still prepared to do investigative journalism where this controversial matter is concerned?

  10. George, LarryD in the comments summed it up precisely: “the behavior of the AGW partisans is consistent with grabbing power over people and societies, they’re not interested in rational solutions to AGW at all.”

    Back to Johann Hari, I believe he has outdone himself with this despairing cry upon witnessing the hilarious and utter trainwreck of COP15:

    “Throughout the negotiations here, the world’s low-lying island states have clung to the real ideas as a life-raft, because they are the only way to save their countries from a swelling sea. It has been extraordinary to watch their representatives – quiet, sombre people with sad eyes – as they were forced to plead for their own existence. They tried persuasion and hard science and lyrical hymns of love for their lands, and all were ignored.”

    Although, George Monbiot’s emotional elegy was perhaps even better:

    “Goodbye Africa, goodbye south Asia; goodbye glaciers and sea ice, coral reefs and rainforest. It was nice knowing you. Not that we really cared. The governments which moved so swiftly to save the banks have bickered and filibustered while the biosphere burns.”

    (Full texts here and here
    , hat tip to James Delingpole here
    .)

    The thing is, after such excesses, where do Johann and George M go from here? George M has now said his tearful farewells to Africa, the glaciers, coral reefs etc. What on earth will he (and Johann) do in 2019 or 2029, if it emerges that these places are, ahem, less completely doomed than they had thought?

  11. I was pleased to see this report about Johann Hari and agree with everything you said about the article. Even better was the rubbish in his article on 2 December when he said we “face a threat as terrible as that posed by Hitler”. The common link is that Hitler invented the concept of the Aryan Race and the IPCC has invented the concept of man-made global warming. I don’t know what has happend to the standard of reporting in the Independent – it is no longer worth reading, erspecially J Hari. No wonder there is talk of it being sold to a Russian!

  12. “By now, Hari has drifted far from his reference point of the physics of the greenhouse and is bobbing around helplessly in a sea of catastrophism. The gap can be bridged only by a blatant untruth. Having started the paragraph with the statement that what followed were the true facts, he just makes it up.”

    As we now know, Johann Hari has been rather less than honest on quite a few occasions. Brendan O’Neill has a good article in the Telegraph about the tyranny of the “good lie”:
    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/brendanoneill2/100094506/johann-hari-and-the-tyranny-of-the-good-lie/

    ‘The key problem with Hari’s approach to interviews, and with his justification of it in this morning’s Independent, is that he has deployed the Noble Truth defence – the idea that it is okay to play fast and loose with the facts, and with reality itself, just so long as you end up telling a “greater truth”.’

    In a climate context, this is reminiscent of Stephen Schneider’s “scary scenarios” and “simplified, dramatic statements”…

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